Church of England, Chapel Haddlesey, St. John the Baptist, parish

Identity area

Type of entity

Corporate body

Authorized form of name

Church of England, Chapel Haddlesey, St. John the Baptist, parish

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1873-

History

Chapel Haddlesey, sometimes known as Middle Haddlesey, was a chapel of ease within the parish of Birkin, dedicated to St John the Baptist. The chapel, which dated to at least the fourteenth century, was rebuilt and enlarged in 1836. In 1873 Chapel Haddlesey, West Haddlesey, Temple Hirst and Hirst Courtney separated from Birkin parish to form the new parish of Chapel Haddlesey.

Today the parish, which includes St John the Baptist Church in Chapel Haddlesey and St John’s Chapel at Temple Hirst, is part of the united benefice of Haddlesey with Hambleton and Birkin.

Places

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Related entity

Church of England, Birkin with Haddlesey, St. Mary, parish (fl 12th century-)

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Access points area

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

Institution identifier

GB 193

Rules and/or conventions used

ISAAR(CPF): International Standard Archival Authority Record for Corporate Bodies, Persons and Families, International Council on Archives (2nd edition, 2003); Rules for the construction of personal, place and corporate names, National Council on Archives (1997).

Status

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Created by S. A. Shearn, 16.02.16.

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

George Lawton, ‘Collections relative to Churches and Chapels within the Diocese of York’ (London, 1842).

C.C. Webb, ‘A Guide to the Parish Records in the Borthwick Institute of Historical Research’ (York, 1987).

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