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Archival descriptions
The Retreat Archive series
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ATTENDANTS' TIME BOOKS

These are small notebooks recording individual attendants' timekeeping, with comments like 'good,' 'bad', 'improved', when ill etc

ATTENDANTS' INSPECTION OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION

A signed statement was made by the attendant that a patient had been received into the ward and bathed, and any marks or bruises on admission were noted. The printed rule about the inspection of patients on admission, undated, c 1866 can be found ...

PENSIONS

At public asylums, pensions were available for officers and servants under legislation passed as early as 1853. However, private institutions like the Retreat were not covered by this and subsequent statutory provision. The Lunacy Commissioners re...

REGISTERS OF MECHANICAL RESTRAINT AND SECLUSION

The Act 53 Victoria c. 5 Sect. 40 (the Lunacy Act of 1845) provided for the controlled use and certification of mechanical restraint which was to be regulated by the Commissioners in Lunacy. The regulations of the Commissioners (later the Board of...

GAINSBOROUGH HOUSE AND THROXENBY HALL, SCARBOROUGH

The Retreat rented properties on the Yorkshire coast for some years with the purpose of allowing patients annual holidays. It was decided in the 1880s to rent or purchase a property to have a year round convalescent home which could also be used f...

NURSE TRAINING AT THE RETREAT

Formal training of Retreat nurses began in 1894. Nurse probationers [student nurses] received training through practical experience and lectures, took examinations and were awarded Retreat certificates (the Tuke Certificate). Outstanding nurses mi...

Retreat Psychiatrists' private consulting practice

Retreat psychiatrists also acted as consultants, seeing private patients and patients referred to them by other doctors. Private patients were seen either at the Retreat, or at consulting rooms elsewhere.Such consulting work formally began under D...

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